Image of Pinkerton Avocado

The Pinkerton avocado gets its name from the Pinkerton Ranch in Saticoy, California, where it first appeared in the early 1970s.

Scientific Binomial Name: Persea americana

SELECTION INFORMATION
Usage

Salads, guacamole, dressings, sandwiches, hamburgers.

Selection

The Pinkerton avocado is green with a smooth skin. Signs of ripeness differ by variety, but all varieties yield to gentle pressure when ripe. (Softer for guacamole, more firm for slicing).

Avoid

Avoid extremely soft avocados with very dark or blotchy skin or dented areas. This indicates bruised or old avocados.

Storage

If you want to speed ripening, do not refrigerate avocados until they are ripe to your preference.

If you want to slow ripening, immediately store avocados in the refrigerator.

Ripening

To ripen an avocado, place it in a sealed plastic bag with a ripe banana at room temperature.

Another method to ripen is to bury the avocado completely in a jar of flour.

  • Nutritional Information
  • Avocados are very low in Cholesterol and Sodium. They're also a good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Vitamin K and Folate.

  • Tips & Trivia
  • To ripen an avocado, place it in a sealed plastic bag with a ripe banana at room temperature.

    Another method is to bury the avocado completely in a jar of flour. Do not refrigerate avocados until they are ripe.

    Avocados must reach full maturity before they are picked, but they will not soften on the tree. The tree is actually used as a warehouse; the fruit can be kept on the tree for months after reaching maturity.

    Until the mid 20th century, the avocado had a well-entrenched reputation for inducing sexual prowess and wasn't purchased or consumed by any person wishing to protect their image from slanderous assault. Growers had to sponsor a public relations campaign to dispel the ill-founded reputation before avocados became popular.

    Avocados date back to 8,000 B.C., and are native to Mexico and Central America.

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